The Cookie Law Explained

The Cookie Law is a piece of privacy legislation that requires websites to get consent from visitors to store or retrieve any information on a computer, smartphone or tablet.

It was designed to protect online privacy, by making consumers aware of how information about them is collected and used online, and give them a choice to allow it or not.

 

Site Owners Start Complying

It started as an EU Directive that was adopted by all EU countries in May 2011. The Directive gave individuals rights to refuse the use of cookies that reduce their online privacy. Each country then updated its own laws to comply. In the UK this meant an update to the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations.

 

Why Cookie Law?

Almost all websites use cookies - little data files - to store information in peoples' web browsers. Some websites contain hundreds of them.

There are other technologies, like Flash and HTML5 Local Storage that do similar things, and these are also covered by the legislation, but as cookies are the most common technology in use, it has become known as the Cookie Law.

 

What are Cookies Anyway?

Cookies are a kind of short term memory for the web. They are stored in your browser and enable a site to 'remember' little bits of information between pages or visits.

They are widely used to make the web experience more personal, which is generally seen as a positive thing. However some cookies collect data across many websites, creating 'behavioural profiles' of people. These profiles can then be used to decide what content or adverts to show you. This use of cookies for targeting in particular is what the law was designed to highlight. By requiring websites to inform and obtain consent from visitors it aims to give web users more control over their online privacy.

 

 


 

Intellectual Property in Websites: Ownership & Protection

We all have ideas, ideas cannot be protected as such; only the expression of ideas can be protected.

Different types of ideas can be protected in different ways, depending on how they are expressed. This intellectual output and the protection of it is known as intellectual property, a collective term for different types of asset including copyright, trade marks, patents, design rights and others. These assets are intangible, but can be very valuable since they enjoy legal protection.

The work does not have to be novel or unique. It just has to originate from the author i.e. it must not be copied but must be created as a result of some skill, labour and judgement. The work must also be 'recorded in writing or otherwise'  but the method of fixation is irrelevant and could even include computer memory.


Infringement of copyright

Copyright in something is infringed if it is reproduced in any material form. Therefore, you risk infringing copyright if you reproduce someone else's website content on your website without permission. 

Copyright protection does not grant the owner a monopoly in something, it only prevents copying. When users violate rules the owner will be able to take actions. This applies to abusive actions done by website visitors.


© 2007 - 2018 Budo-Ryu International. All Rights Reserved. The website artistic works are the intellectual property of Budo-Ryu International Please do not copy, reproduce, paste, photocopy, take screenshots, cut or mutilate the pictures, text, graphics or logos, available in the website, in whole or in part, without permission. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

© 2007 - 2018 Budo-Ryu International. All Rights Reserved. The website artistic works are the intellectual property of Budo-Ryu International Please do not copy, reproduce, paste, photocopy, take screenshots, cut or mutilate the pictures, text, graphics or logos, available in the website, in whole or in part, without permission. If you want a copy just ask